What Trauma Docs Know

Call it a dubious distinction, but Chicago is one of the best places in America to get field experience as a trauma surgeon. The city’s Level 1 trauma centers — hospitals specially equipped to handle the most severe injuries — treat a staggering volume and variety of patients, including, most notably, victims of so-called penetrating trauma, typically gunshot and knife wounds. In Chicago, such cases constitute nearly 30 percent of all Level 1 trauma admissions, compared with 4 percent nationwide
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How the Patriarchy Protects Itself – Kim Bellware –

The men of the Senate Judiciary Committee stepped carefully into last week’s hearing with Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh, well aware that the specter of Justice Clarence Thomas’ 1991 confirmation was still in the room. Those closely watching the proceedings hoped that enough had shifted in the cultural landscape since the last time another accomplished, professional woman — Anita Hill — leveled claims of sexual misconduct against a powerful man seeking to gain even more powe

’s Chicago and Illinois News Roundup: August 31, 2018

In this week’s Friday News Roundup, host Jenn White breaks down the biggest news stories of the week, including Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke’s trial, former President Barack Obama's visit to Chicago and construction on Lake Shore Drive. President Obama shares the vision of the Presidential Center (YouTube 8/28/18) Chicagoans Spend More Than A Year Of Their Lives Getting To And From Work, Report Says (Block Club Chicago 8/29/18) Prosecutors seek to jail Van Dyke for Chicago Tribune

Dan Bigg Revolutionized Opioid Treatment

Dan Bigg, the longtime harm reduction advocate who challenged the stigma of opioid addiction and saved lives through his efforts to expand the use of the overdose reversal medication, Naloxone, died at his Chicago home on Tuesday. He was 59. The Cook County Medical Examiner said the cause of death is still undetermined. For nearly three decades, Bigg served as the director of the Chicago Recovery Alliance, a primarily mobile support organization that offers education, care, and recovery help f

Opinion | Rudy Giuliani Is Wrong About Chicago’s Bloodshed

The “let cops be cops” solution — most recently peddled on “Fox & Friends” in light of the bloody weekend — feeds the delusion that police officers themselves can actually control crime, that the causes of and prescriptions for plagues like gun violence are untied to socioeconomic factors. Giving the police more of anything — more numbers, more money, more liberties — to quell violence is still a reactionary, and thus limited, posture. And yes, so is simply calling for tougher gun laws (regulations the city of Chicago has, but its immediate surrounding area does not). To the communities affected, policing and gun laws are only parts of the puzzle.

Opinion | Local Media Needs Security. What Chance the Rapper’s Purchase of Chicagoist Means.

In mid-July, the 25-year-old Chicagoan Chancelor Bennett, known to the world as Chance the Rapper, released an unannounced batch of songs for social media and the blogosphere to feed on. In 2018, this happens all the time in music. But embedded in the lyrics of “I Might Need Security,” the most viral of his four new tracks, was a genuine surprise. He wrapped up a line rebuking bias in local media with a decree: He’s going to own part of it. “I got a hit list so long I don’t know how to finish/

What Trauma Docs Know

Call it a dubious distinction, but Chicago is one of the best places in America to get field experience as a trauma surgeon. The city’s Level 1 trauma centers — hospitals specially equipped to handle the most severe injuries — treat a staggering volume and variety of patients, including, most notably, victims of so-called penetrating trauma, typically gunshot and knife wounds. In Chicago, such cases constitute nearly 30 percent of all Level 1 trauma admissions, compared with 4 percent nationwide

The Sisters of Perpetual Resistance

Just after sunrise on a below-freezing January morning, a huddle of people gathered outside a nondescript Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in the Chicago suburb of Broadview for a vigil the Interfaith Community for Detained Immigrants (ICDI) has been holding every week for more than 11 years. About a dozen people huddled in close to block out the freezing wind and to pray, sing, and encourage one another in the slow-moving battle for immigration reform. Attendees prayed for co

Friends and Fans of Studs Terkel on Their Favorite Interviews from His New Archive

A recurring observation about Studs Terkel is that he never conducted a boring interview. In the 45 years he spent as a broadcaster with WFMT, Terkel recorded more than 5,600 programs where conducted nearly hour-long, nuanced interviews with everyone from James Baldwin to teenage students at the former Metro High School in Old Town. With help from the Library of Congress, the miles of tape have been gradually undergoing a digitization process in order to preserve them and make them accessible to

BallotReady Is a One-Stop Shop for Candidate Info

The idea:A website that makes it easy to research candidates and issues that will appear on your ballot The aha moment:Alex Niemczewski, a Chicago design consultant, didn’t want to make any bad guesses when voting in the 2014 midterm election. But getting informed proved daunting: “I just remember researching one judicial race,” says Niemczewski, 30, “and when I looked up, four hours had gone by.” Since then:Niemczewski discussed her frustrations with Aviva Rosman, a college friend. Seemingly

Noirefy Links Minority Candidates With Companies Looking to Diversify

The idea:A jobs website that connects employers with candidates of color The aha moment:While browsing the GroupMe messaging app one evening in 2016, Shaniqua Davis, 27, kept noticing missed connections between job seekers and employers looking to hire. “In these large groups, like ‘black professionals in Chicago’ or ‘women’s entrepreneur groups,’ people were saying, ‘Do you know anyone who’s hiring?’ or ‘My company has a job open,’ ” she recalls. The piece that was lacking: someone to bring th

Are Changing Ward Lines a Source of Chicago’s Violence?

The political impact of redrawing voter lines is getting fresh scrutiny thanks to a handful of recent court cases and an upcoming midterm election. A skewed election is the biggest concern that crops up in the wake of redistricting, but University of Chicago sociologist Robert Vargas is looking at another possible outcome: Violence. His results are only preliminary, so it’s too soon to draw firm conclusions, but Vargas says the data thus far shows a correlation between violence and areas with v

Experts Say the Trump Administration's Push for Death Penalties for Drug Dealers Is Misguided

In an effort the stem the tide of deaths from the U.S.’s opioid epidemic, the Trump administration is pursuing a policy that could lead to more people dying. Days after President Donald Trump controversially called for the execution of some drug dealers in cases of fatal opioid overdoses, as the BBC reported , attorney general Jeff Sessions formalized the proposal. On Wednesday, March 21, Sessions sent a memo to federal prosecutors outlining how they could pursue the death penalty for certain dr

The Scholar Helping America Grapple with Its Ugly History

Shock has emerged as the signature emotional response to the organized confusion of the Trump era. The president is at war with the same agents of federal law enforcement investigating his old campaign. Just months after an alt-right rally in Charlottesville ended in death, emboldened white supremacists are littering college campuses with propaganda. And an immigration system that was already broken has been thrown into even more chaos by a White House bent on vindictive, nativist policies. All

With ‘Making Obama,’ WBEZ Charts His Long Path to the White House

“A story like mine could have happened in another city, but my story could have only happened here,” former President Barack Obama says in an excerpt of the new six-part documentary podcast, “Making Obama,” which WBEZ debuts today. The two decades of Obama’s life between his mid-‘80s arrival in Chicago to his star-making keynote address at the 2004 Democratic National Convention are considered by insiders—and Obama himself—to be his most politically and ideologically formative. That period is t

CPS Has a New CEO (Again). Here’s What to Know

It’s a news item that’s becoming all too familiar: Chicago Public Schools is getting a new CEO. The former head of CPS, Forrest Claypool, announced his resignation Friday amid an ethics scandal, and Chief Education Officer Janice Jackson is stepping in as the interim CEO—the eighth schools chief that Chicago has seen in the last 10 years (two of which, excluding Jackson, were interim chiefs). Despite the turnover and the less-than-inspiring reasons for Claypool’s ouster, some in the local educa
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